Plant Doctor's Seasonal Report

The Plant Doctor's Seasonal Report brings you the most important and interesting seasonal Wisconsin tree care information. This is where our Wisconsin Certified Arborists share their experience and passion for all aspects of the tree care industry. From preventative plant health care topics like the Wisconsin Emerald Ash Borer epidemic to daily happenings at the Wachtel office, the Plant Doctor's Seasonal Report keeps you informed.

Read below to see the most up to date tree care information from our Wachtel staff of Certified Arborists and Wisconsin tree care specialists. For even more information on important tree care, take a look at our Wisconsin tree care news blog.

Contact our Wisconsin tree service specialists today to learn more about Wachtel Tree Science

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Summer 2013-A Tale of Two Oaks

Summer 2013-A Tale of Two Oaks By: Jake Kubisiak Certified Arborist The First Oak – A Tragedy My first real job was as a county park maintenance worker. The work included mowing, cleaningtoilets, painting, and lots of other maintenance work. One summer my job involved removing thenumerous tree stumps from our campgrounds. Over 200 oaks had died from Oak Wilt. It radically changed the campgrounds. Why did all these trees die? Was there a way to prevent this diseaseloss of trees? At the time I only knew that Oak Wilt was a nasty disease that seemed inevitable. As the story of the first oak ends in tragedy the next story is yet to be told. The mighty Oak is a useful and beautiful tree. Whether in a group or a single tree, Oaks areusually one of the more valued trees in the landscape. Oaks provide shade, food and housing forwildlife, and provide a source of quality wood products. The species can often survive for severalgenerations even as long as 250 years. One weak spot is of...

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Spring 2013- Simplifying EAB

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

 By: Keith Glaznap Certified Arborist WI-0678A

Wouldn’t it be nice if all questions had a simple answer?  Life would be so much easier if all answers could be summed up in one word.  Although there are no easy answers to emerald ash borer, hopefully I can help make your decision on what to do with your ash trees a bit easier.

Let me start with a couple of facts.  We know that untreated ash trees are vulnerable to emerald ash borer (EAB).  We also know that ash trees found to have EAB could still be saved if the borer population is low enough in those trees. (Note:  Trees with >40% crown thinning are heavily infested and no longer savable) 

The confusion usually begins with the following questions:  When do I start treating my ash trees?  Do the treatments work?  How often will I have to treat my ash trees? 

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Spring 2013-Root-Rot

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By:Jake Kubisiak-Certified Arborist IL-1392A

Shhh…..can you hear it?  Put your ear to the ground and listen a little closer.  It’s the cries of help coming from your plants having sustained damage from last season’s drought.  Now listen again.  Could it be a party happening at the same time?  It’s; the raucous sound coming from decay pathogens enjoying the buffet of dead roots.  Many fungal organisms lay dormant in the soil until conditions are favorable.  With the possibility of a wet spring, root rot issues will only be exacerbated.

Some common factors that create a life threatening situation for your landscape plant include:

- A previously weak plant (drought stressed)

- Poor drainage

- A basal injury

- Poor quality or compacted soil

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Spring 2013 - Ready, Set, Borers

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By: Anthony Arnoldi - Board Certified Master Arborist WI-0102B

Wood-boring insects are at the top of the list of concerns arborists have for the trees they care for. They cause damage that cannot be ignored. Their damage is not just cosmetic, but significant, permanent and potentially lethal.  Last year’s heat and drought has set up a situation where that concern is much more elevated.

Generally, borers are not able to attack just any tree they fly to. They need a tree that has been weakened or compromised in some way. They need a tree whose defenses are diminished and cannot fight back as well. (There are some exceptions to this, such as Emerald Ash Borer, that can attack perfectly healthy trees). Predisposing events that can put a tree at risk include root damage (like trenching, grading, soil compaction), storm damage, improper pruning, flooding, wounding (such as  heavy equipment hitting the trunk), insect damage (defoliation, scale, etc.),  and the list goes on. The extended heat and drought has been severe, and many trees have been stressed enough to have their defenses significantly compromised.

 

Continue Reading

Spring 2013 - Ready, Set, Borers

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By: Anthony Arnoldi - Board Certified Master Arborist WI-0102B

Wood-boring insects are at the top of the list of concerns arborists have for the trees they care for. They cause damage that cannot be ignored. Their damage is not just cosmetic, but significant, permanent and potentially lethal.  Last year’s heat and drought has set up a situation where that concern is much more elevated.

Generally, borers are not able to attack just any tree they fly to. They need a tree that has been weakened or compromised in some way. They need a tree whose defenses are diminished and cannot fight back as well. (There are some exceptions to this, such as Emerald Ash Borer, that can attack perfectly healthy trees). Predisposing events that can put a tree at risk include root damage (like trenching, grading, soil compaction), storm damage, improper pruning, flooding, wounding (such as  heavy equipment hitting the trunk), insect damage (defoliation, scale, etc.),  and the list goes on. The extended heat and drought has been severe, and many trees have been stressed enough to have their defenses significantly compromised.

 

Continue Reading

Spring 2013 - Ready, Set, Borers

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By: Anthony Arnoldi - Board Certified Master Arborist WI-0102B

Wood-boring insects are at the top of the list of concerns arborists have for the trees they care for. They cause damage that cannot be ignored. Their damage is not just cosmetic, but significant, permanent and potentially lethal.  Last year’s heat and drought has set up a situation where that concern is much more elevated.

Generally, borers are not able to attack just any tree they fly to. They need a tree that has been weakened or compromised in some way. They need a tree whose defenses are diminished and cannot fight back as well. (There are some exceptions to this, such as Emerald Ash Borer, that can attack perfectly healthy trees). Predisposing events that can put a tree at risk include root damage (like trenching, grading, soil compaction), storm damage, improper pruning, flooding, wounding (such as  heavy equipment hitting the trunk), insect damage (defoliation, scale, etc.),  and the list goes on. The extended heat and drought has been severe, and many trees have been stressed enough to have their defenses significantly compromised.

 

Continue Reading

Spring 2013 - Ready, Set, Borers

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By: Anthony Arnoldi - Board Certified Master Arborist WI-0102B

Wood-boring insects are at the top of the list of concerns arborists have for the trees they care for. They cause damage that cannot be ignored. Their damage is not just cosmetic, but significant, permanent and potentially lethal.  Last year’s heat and drought has set up a situation where that concern is much more elevated.

Generally, borers are not able to attack just any tree they fly to. They need a tree that has been weakened or compromised in some way. They need a tree whose defenses are diminished and cannot fight back as well. (There are some exceptions to this, such as Emerald Ash Borer, that can attack perfectly healthy trees). Predisposing events that can put a tree at risk include root damage (like trenching, grading, soil compaction), storm damage, improper pruning, flooding, wounding (such as  heavy equipment hitting the trunk), insect damage (defoliation, scale, etc.),  and the list goes on. The extended heat and drought has been severe, and many trees have been stressed enough to have their defenses significantly compromised.

 

Continue Reading

Spring 2013-Hello BOB

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By: Jean Ferdinandsen – Certified Arborist WI-0149A

A serious leaf blight disease on bur oaks has become a problem in the Midwest. Wet spring weather the last few years has especially increased the incidence of bur oak blight- BOB.

Caused by a fungus that overwinters on the leaf petioles (leaf stalk), BOB occurs mostly on naturally established trees. Bur oaks that produce smaller acorns and are on upland sites are more susceptible to the disease.

Leaf symptoms appear in late July or August. Affected leaves develop brown or purple lesions along the midrib and main veins. Large areas of the leaf die as the disease progresses, giving an overall wilted or scorched appearance. These symptoms may resemble and have been confused with oak wilt. A unique feature of BOB is that some of the killed leaves remain on the tree during the winter. Healthy bur oaks shed their leaves in the fall.

Continue Reading

Spring 2013-Hello BOB

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By: Jean Ferdinandsen – Certified Arborist WI-0149A

A serious leaf blight disease on bur oaks has become a problem in the Midwest. Wet spring weather the last few years has especially increased the incidence of bur oak blight- BOB.

Caused by a fungus that overwinters on the leaf petioles (leaf stalk), BOB occurs mostly on naturally established trees. Bur oaks that produce smaller acorns and are on upland sites are more susceptible to the disease.

Leaf symptoms appear in late July or August. Affected leaves develop brown or purple lesions along the midrib and main veins. Large areas of the leaf die as the disease progresses, giving an overall wilted or scorched appearance. These symptoms may resemble and have been confused with oak wilt. A unique feature of BOB is that some of the killed leaves remain on the tree during the winter. Healthy bur oaks shed their leaves in the fall.

Continue Reading

Spring 2013-Hello BOB

Fall 2010 Newsletter in Adobe PDF format

By: Jean Ferdinandsen – Certified Arborist WI-0149A

A serious leaf blight disease on bur oaks has become a problem in the Midwest. Wet spring weather the last few years has especially increased the incidence of bur oak blight- BOB.

Caused by a fungus that overwinters on the leaf petioles (leaf stalk), BOB occurs mostly on naturally established trees. Bur oaks that produce smaller acorns and are on upland sites are more susceptible to the disease.

Leaf symptoms appear in late July or August. Affected leaves develop brown or purple lesions along the midrib and main veins. Large areas of the leaf die as the disease progresses, giving an overall wilted or scorched appearance. These symptoms may resemble and have been confused with oak wilt. A unique feature of BOB is that some of the killed leaves remain on the tree during the winter. Healthy bur oaks shed their leaves in the fall.

Continue Reading

 

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